Webinar
In-person event

Cloud native observability done right: OpenTelemetry

Speaker of the webinar:
Ben Sigelman
Co-founder and CEO at Lightstep
Mar 2, 2022
Location:
Duration:
45min
2 hours
7:00 pm
CEST
PDT
12:00 PM
CDT
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Observability is a hot topic (and buzzword) in cloud-native applications, and for good reason: it’s impossible to both innovate quickly and maintain high reliability in distributed software applications, without effective observability. Observability is a complex topic that’s made more confusing by muddy marketing messages and an alphabet soup of new technologies and OSS projects. In this talk, Ben Sigelman will describe the overarching goals and architecture of an effective observability strategy, then focus on OpenTelemetry in particular: the what, the why, and the “how to get started.”

 He will walk you though: 

  • The anatomy of observability
  • How OpenTelemetry enables teams to better understand software performance and behavior
  • Getting started with OpenTelemetry

After a 30 minutes talk, there will be 15 minutes for Q&A. We’d like to encourage you to submit your questions in advance.

A recording of the webinar and related materials will be shared with webinar attendees afterwards.

Audience - who should join?

DevOps Engineers, Site Reliability Engineers, System Engineers, Infrastructure Kubernetes Administrators, Technical Architects, Application Developers with an affinity with DevOps and Technical Management.

Cloud native observability done right: OpenTelemetry

Mar 2, 2022
7:00 pm
CEST
PDT
12:00 PM
CDT
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Watch the video of this webinar

Mar 2, 2022
7:00 pm
CEST
11:00 AM
CDT

Ben Sigelman

Co-founder and CEO at Lightstep

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Ben Sigelman is a co-founder and the GM of Lightstep and a co-creator of Dapper (Google’s distributed tracing system), Monarch (Google’s metrics system), and the CNCF’s OpenTelemetry project. Ben’s work and interests gravitate towards observability, especially where microservices, high transaction volumes, and large engineering organizations are involved.